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Posted on November 14th 2014

Why I Don’t Do Code Katas

I don't want to seem like I am bragging, but there is something I just have to get off my chest.

But, before I tell you what amazing skill I have mastered through countless hours of boring practice, let me tell you a bit about my training schedule.

Everyday I get up in the morning. I put on my shoes. I begin my practice.
Usually I start with a small warm-up, just to get the blood flowing on the way to my office at the end of the hall.

Later in the day, I'll wander out of my office for lunch and practice more on the way to the kitchen.

Right now as I am typing out this blog post, I am on the treadmill honing my craft one painstaking repetitive step at a time.

That is right, you may have guessed it by now—I am a master walker.

All my life I have been practicing this humble skill. Each and every day I practice my secret craft. I see other fools riding around on mopeds and motorized scooters sheepishly talking of their perceived skill at bipedal transportation. But, although outwardly I acknowledge their words, inwardly I know that I am special, because I hone my skill to a craft.

Sounds ludicrous? That is what it sounds like to me when some people talk about doing code katas.

Code Katas

What is a Code Kata you may ask? Some people think a Code Kata is when you solve the same programming problem over and over again, thinking you are actually practicing something other than using shortcuts in your IDE. (To be fair, not all people view Code Katas that way.)

code kata

These kinds of Code Katas come from a failed attempt to forcibly simulate the same kind of practicing that a musician or athlete would perform in order to become better at their vocation.

Why Code Katas aren’t effective

Don't get me wrong, the intention behind Code Katas seems to be well placed, and I am all for software craftsmanship (although not the elitism that sometimes accompanies it.) But, just as walking every single day doesn't make you a master walker, and driving a car every day doesn't make you a superior driver, solving the same sets of programming problems over and over again won't make you a master programmer.

If you still have your doubts, consider old people. Old people are not master walkers or master drivers, yet they have been doing both of those activities day in and day out for many years. Not only do they not master these skills, the skills actually atrophy—they become worse at them, and not just because their muscles and reflexes become worse from age, it is because repeating the same thing over and over again without an increasing level of challenge actually results in the mind becoming complacent with the activity which leads to the eventual degradation of it. (At least, this appears to be the case to me.)

Don't lose hope though, a little later on I will tell you a real way to practice your craft in software development—one that will give you results—but, first let's dissect the cases of walking and driving a little bit further to see why repeated practice of those activities seems to have diminishing returns.

Doing the same thing over and over again doesn’t make us better at it

We first learn from walking and driving, because everything is new and challenging. Although walking seems like a repetitive process, it is actually the lack of repetition that provides the challenge our brain and body need to actually benefit from it.

As a toddler learning to walk or a teenager learning to drive, we are constantly bombarded with new scenarios and challenges that we haven't faced before. What happens when the dog runs by and brushes our leg? How does this affect our balance and what do we have to do to adjust? What about this new surface? The carpet seems to absorb our feet and create more friction when we attempt to walk on it. How do we compensate to balance on this surface? Walking with socks on the floor gives us less grip, etc.

cute baby girl making first steps, colorful outdoors

But, as an adult, or experienced walker or driver, we are not challenged in nearly the same way; we've already seen most of the scenarios. Our daily commute to work rarely presents us with an unfamiliar stimulus or problem to solve. We operate on autopilot, automatically walking and driving to our destinations without much effort or thought.

Repeatedly writing the code to solve the same programming problem over and over again is exactly the same thing, except unless you are introducing new challenges by adding constraints and twists, you are only benefiting from the exercise the first, and perhaps, the second time, you undertake the activity.

Now, not all programmers who do Code Katas repeat the exact same code over and over again. Some of them attempt to solve the same problem, but this time not using any loops or limited the line count to a certain number or some other similar constraint. This kind of practice is actual worthwhile practice which challenges the mind and introduces new scenarios that create new neural pathways in the brain and strengthen others. (Here is a great example of book that encourages you to do just that. I highly recommend working through the problems in this book.)

Simply typing the same code into the same IDE over and over again for 10 minutes a day may make you feel relaxed and calm or even like a concert violinist arduously practicing their scales, but at the very best it will make you faster at using your IDE and typing code; skills which can be easily practiced through the course of a normal day's work. If you want to be really good at writing the code to sort lists of words and calculate prices for grocery store items in a cart, go ahead, be my guest.

How real mastery is achieved

If you are resisting what I am saying at this point, it is likely because you still mistakenly believe that walking and driving are in a different category than playing music, sports and programming. But, the truth of the matter is that walking, running, music, sports, and programming are in the same category, or rather, there are no categories.

It turns out there are actually master walker and master drivers. One sport that is not all that widely known goes by the name of Parkour or Freerunning. Don't believe me, check out this video for an example. In this sport, the athlete becomes exceptionally good at traversing around everyday locations on their own two feet. It is amazing what some of these practitioners can do—just watch the video if you don't believe me.

And as for driving, I probably don't need to convince you that Nascar is "kind of a big deal."

My point is that you are not going to become a Parkour expert or Nascar driver by just walking around your neighborhood or driving your car to and from work, even if you do tend to drive like a bat out of hell. To get to that level of skill in those seemingly mundane activities, you have to constantly practice at a higher level of difficulty and continually introduce new challenges.

In fact, when we actually look at what real musicians and sports athletes do, it is much of the same. I seriously doubt many musicians you hear on the radio or see in concert repeatedly played "bah bah black sheep" or "twinkle twinkle little star" on their instruments until one day they achieved mastery. And in the professional sports world, achievement only comes through repeatedly pushing beyond one's limits day after day.

The point is this: if you want to get better at something, repeating practice alone is not enough. You must practice with increased difficulty and challenge.

How to improve your programming skills

So, how then do you become a master craftsman at the vocation of software development? If you don't use Code Katas, how do you practice your craft?
Let me start off by giving you the best example I have ever seen.

This is Jennifer Dewalt's blog; she decided to learn to code by building 180 websites in 180 days. While you are sitting at your keyboard typing the same 20 lines of code into your IDE over and over again, Jennifer is creating a new thing every single day and facing a brand new challenge.

Who do you think will improve their skills more after 180 days, you or Jennifer? I know who I'd hire without even thinking twice.

I get lots of emails asking me about the best way to learn programming or how someone can improve their skills. Recently, I've gotten a lot of emails asking about how to learn Android development. Do you know what I tell all these inquisitive minds?

Make Android apps.

But, umm, what book can I read?

No book, just come up with an idea and try to create it. Figure out what you need to do along the way. When you get stuck, go look for the answer or seek help.
But, I need to know what I am doing first.

Says who? Do and then learn. Learn and do at the same time, reading a book or repeating the same exercise over and over again won't make you smarter or more skillful; constantly challenging your mind and current skills will.

Want to learn more?

I've got plenty more to say on the topic and many more techniques that are way more effective then Code Katas which you can use to hone your programming skills. I can't fit it into a single post like this, but I'll be putting it into the top secret project I am working on to help developers boost their careers and learn to market themselves.

If you'd like to be one of the first to be notified when it is available, sign up here. I'll be including lots of practical valuable information that you probably won't find anywhere else.

So, what do you think? Do you do Code Katas right now? If so, do you think they are actually useful? Let me know in the comments below.

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